What was the result of your experimentation in class?

Revisit your post in the Padlet, and comment on how it went. Explain what happened, and how students responded. What did you encounter, and changes might you make before next time?

Made with Padlet

Reflection is a key skill in learning, and when we share our tests and trials, we’re activating powerful cognitive structures for retention and resiliency. Innovation and experimentation is also an ongoing process (McGrath et al, 2016). Over time our practices deepen, crossing a threshold of teaching enhancement into teaching transformation.

So how do we evaluate the level of depth at which we’re experimenting? How do we reflect on whether our proposed solutions are going deep enough, and really tackling our learner challenge?

Enter, the SAMR model.

“The SAMR model” by WikiMedia Commons. Retrieved July 27th, 2019.

Proposed by Reuben Puentedura in 2006, the SAMR model is a way of thinking about the pedagogical depth of educational technologies. This model asks us to consider how a technology mediates our teaching approaches, considering whether it

  • substitutes in for other, non-technological approaches;
  • augments approaches by improving them somehow;
  • modifies approaches by allowing them to be redesigned;
  • or redefines approaches, letting us teach in new ways.

Below, Reuben shares some experiences of applying this model to teaching practices.

“How to Apply the SAMR Model with Reuben Puentedura” by Common Sense Education. Retrieved from the Common Sense Education YouTube channel, July 31st, 2019.

Often, we begin working with tools in the substitution and augmentation levels, as we learn them and become comfortable. We then might begin to flex our technical delivery, enhancing and modifying our practice by exploring the tool with more depth.

The most rewarding tech for teaching facilitates innovative teaching approaches, impossible before its introduction.

 Not all tools get us there. But when they do, they create “gateways to each other’s knowledge” as Reuben says.

How will you know when a technology might be redefining your practices? Share your thoughts in the Mentimeter.

References

[Image file]. “The SAMR model” by WikiMedia Commons. Retrieved July 27th, 2019.

McGrath, C  et al. (2016). The Ebb and Flow of Educational Change: Change Agents as Negotiators of Change. Teaching & Learning Inquiry 4(2).

[Video file]. “How to Apply the SAMR Model with Reuben Puentedura” by Common Sense Education. Retrieved from the Common Sense Education YouTube channel, July 31st, 2019.